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Windows Server



    

Examine the DNS settings and network properties on the servers and client computers    

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Examine the DNS settings and network properties on the servers and client computers



Apr
26

Examine the DNS settings and network properties on the servers and client computers

 

As taken from KB 887303

 

In the local area connection properties, Client for Microsoft Networks must be enabled on all servers and client computers. The File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks component must be enabled on all domain controllers.

Additionally, every computer on the network must use DNS servers that can resolve SRV records and host names for the Active Directory forest where the computer is a member. Typically, a common configuration error is for the client computers to use the DNS servers that belong to your Internet service provider (ISP).

On all the computers that have logged the Userenv errors, examine the DNS settings and network properties. Additionally, check these settings on all domain controllers, whether or not they log Userenv errors.

To verify DNS settings and network properties on Windows XP-based computers in your network, follow these steps:

1.      Click Start, and then click Control Panel.

2.      If Control Panel is set to Category View, click Switch to Classic View.

3.      Double-click Network Connections, right-click Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.

4.      On the General tab, click to select the Client for Microsoft Networks check box.

5.      Click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

6.      If Use the following DNS server addresses is selected, make sure that the IP addresses for the preferred and alternate DNS servers are the IP addresses of DNS servers that can resolve SRV records and host names in Active Directory. Specifically, the computer must not use the DNS servers that belong to your ISP. If the DNS server addresses are not correct, type the IP addresses of the correct DNS servers in the Preferred DNS server and Alternate DNS server boxes.

7.      Click Advanced, and then click the DNS tab.

8.      Click to select the Register this connection's addresses in DNS check box, and then click OK three times.

9.      Start a command prompt. To do this, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

10. Type ipconfig /flushdns, and then press ENTER. Type ipconfig /registerdns, and then press ENTER.

11. Restart the computer for your changes to take effect.

To verify DNS settings and network properties on Windows 2000-based computers in your network, follow these steps:

1.      Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.

2.      Double-click Network and Dial-up Connections.

3.      Right-click Local area connection, and then click Properties.

4.      On the General tab, click to select the Client for Microsoft Networks check box.

5.      If the computer is a domain controller, click to select the File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks check box. 

Note On multi-homed Remote Access servers and Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server-based servers, you can disable the File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks component for the network adaptor that is connected to the Internet. However, the Client for Microsoft Networks component must be enabled for all the server's network adaptors.

6.      Click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

7.      If Use the following DNS server addresses is selected, make sure that the IP addresses for the preferred and alternate DNS servers are the IP addresses of DNS servers that can resolve SRV records and host names in Active Directory. Specifically, the computer must not use the DNS servers that belong to your ISP. If the DNS server addresses are not correct, type the IP addresses of the correct DNS servers in the Preferred DNS server and Alternate DNS server boxes.

8.      Click Advanced, and then click the DNS tab.

9.      Click to select the Register this connection's addresses in DNS check box, and then click OK three times.

10. Start a command prompt. To do this, click Start, click Run, type cmd in the Open box, and then click OK.

11. Type ipconfig /flushdns, and then press ENTER. Type ipconfig /registerdns, and then press ENTER.

12. Restart the computer.

To verify DNS settings and network properties on Windows Server 2003-based computers in your network, follow these steps:

1.      Click Start, point to Control Panel, and then double-click Network Connections.

2.      Right-click the local area connection, and then click Properties.

3.      On the General tab, click to select the Client for Microsoft Networks check box.

4.      If the computer is a domain controller, click to select the File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks check box. 

Note On multi-homed Remote Access servers and ISA Server-based servers, , you can disable the File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks component for the network adaptor that is connected to the Internet. However, the Client for Microsoft Networks component must be enabled for all the server's network adaptors.

5.      Click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

6.      If Use the following DNS server addresses is selected, make sure that the IP addresses for the preferred and alternate DNS servers are the IP addresses of DNS servers that can resolve SRV records and host names in Active Directory. Specifically, the computer must not use the DNS servers that belong to your ISP. If the DNS server addresses are not correct, type the IP addresses of the correct DNS servers in the Preferred DNS server and Alternate DNS server boxes.

7.      Click Advanced, and then click the DNS tab.

8.      Click to select the Register this connection's addresses in DNS check box, and then click OK three times.

9.      Start a command prompt. To do this, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

10. Type ipconfig /flushdns, and then press ENTER. Type ipconfig /registerdns, and then press ENTER.

11. Restart the computer for your changes to take effect.

If the client computers in your network are configured to obtain their IP addresses automatically, make sure that the computer that is running the DHCP service assigns the IP addresses of DNS servers that can resolve SRV records and host names in the Active Directory.

To determine what IP addresses a computer is using for DNS, follow these steps:

1.      Start a command prompt. To do this, click Start, click Run, type cmd in the Open box, and then click OK.

2.      Type ipconfig /all, and then press ENTER.

3.      Note the DNS entries that are listed on the screen.

If computers that are configured to obtain IP addresses automatically are not using the correct DNS servers, view the documentation for your DHCP server for information about how to configure the DNS servers option. Additionally, make sure that each computer can resolve the IP address of the domain. To do this, type ping Your_Domain_Name.Your_Domain_Rootat a command prompt, and then press ENTER. Alternatively, type nslookup Your_Domain_Name.Your_Domain_Root, and then press ENTER.

Note It is expected that this host name will resolve to the IP address of one of the domain controllers on the network. If the computer cannot resolve this name, or if the name resolves to the wrong IP address, make sure that the forward lookup zone for the domain contains valid (same as parent folder) Host (A) records.

To make sure that the forward lookup zone for the domain contains valid (same as parent folder) Host (A) records on a Windows 2000-based computer, follow these steps:

1.      On a domain controller that is running DNS, click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click DNS.

2.      Expand Your_Server_Name, expand Forward Lookup Zones, and then click the forward lookup zone for your domain.

3.      Look for (same as parent folder) Host (A) records.

4.      If a (same as parent folder) Host (A) record does not exist, follow these steps to create one:

a.      On the Action menu, click New Host.

b.      In the IP address box, type the IP address of the domain controller's local network adaptor.

c.       Click to select the Create associated pointer (PTR) record check box, and then click Add Host.

d.      When you receive the following message, click Yes:

(same as parent folder) is not a valid host name. Are you sure you want to add this record?

5.      Double-click the (same as parent folder) Host (A) record.

6.      Verify that the correct IP address is listed in the IP address box.

7.      If the IP address in the IP address box is not valid, type the correct IP address in the IP address box, and then click OK.

8.      Alternatively, you can delete the (same as parent folder) Host (A) record that contains an IP address that is not valid. To delete the (same as parent folder) Host (A) record, right-click it, and then click Delete.

9.      If the DNS server is a domain controller that is also a Routing and Remote Access server, view the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:

292822 Name resolution and connectivity issues on a Routing and Remote Access Server that also runs DNS or WINS

10. On all computers where you add, delete, or modify DNS records, type ipconfig /flushdns at a command prompt, and then press ENTER.

To make sure that the forward lookup zone for the domain contains valid (same as parent folder) Host (A) records on a Windows Server 2003-based computer, follow these steps:

1.      On a domain controller that is running DNS, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click DNS.

2.      Expand Your_Server_Name, expand Forward Lookup Zones, and then click the forward lookup zone for your domain.

3.      Look for the (same as parent folder) Host (A) record.

4.      If the (same as parent folder) Host (A) record does not exist, follow these steps to create one:

a.      On the Action menu, click New Host (A).

b.      In the IP address box, type the IP address of the domain controller's local network adaptor.

c.       Click to select the Create associated pointer (PTR) record check box, and then click Add Host.

d.      When you receive the following message, click Yes:

(same as parent folder) is not a valid host name. Are you sure you want to add this record?

5.      Double-click the (same as parent folder) Host (A) record.

6.      Verify that the correct IP address is listed in the IP address box.

7.      If the IP address is in the IP address box is not valid, type the correct IP address in the IP address box, and then clickOK.

8.      Alternatively, you can delete the (same as parent folder) Host (A) record that contains the IP address that is not valid. To delete the Host (A) record, right-click (same as parent folder), and then click Delete.

9.      If the DNS server is a domain controller that is also a Routing and Remote Access server, view the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:

292822 Name resolution and connectivity issues on a Routing and Remote Access Server that also runs DNS or WINS

10. On all computers where you add, delete, or modify DNS records, type ipconfig /flushdns at a command prompt, and then press ENTER.

 

 

 

 



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